Resources: School to Prison Pipeline

School to Prison Pipeline

Fair School Funding

School to Prison Pipeline

Equal Access

School to Prison Pipeline

School to Prison Pipeline

  • In written testimony, the Education Law Center-PA joined with district students, parents, youth leaders such as the Philadelphia Student Union, and teachers, to urge members of the Philadelphia Board of Education to oppose a policy change that would mandate the use of metal detectors in all district high schools. The school board scheduled a vote on the policy change on March 28, 2019.

    ELC explains that proposed amendments to the school district’s Policy 805 will perpetuate an alarming national trend of “hardening schools” — attempting to protect students through the implementation of policies and practices which are not only ineffective but create a more negative school climate.

    Read our testimony here.

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  • Stoneleigh Foundation Emerging Leader Fellow Ashley Sawyer was invited to speak to the Philadelphia City Council’s newly formed Special Committee on Criminal Justice Reform  on May 23, 2016.  The committee is collaborating in part to meet the goals of a new $3.5 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation to address the city’s high jail population and the racial bias in the city’s justice system.  Ashley presented testimony on the need to address the School to Prison Pipeline and the poor educational opportunities available to incarcerated youth.

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  • In October 2015, the Education Law Center submitted comments to the Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning (OCDEL) on their draft of a proposed policy announcement: “Reduction of Suspensions and Expulsions in Early Childhood Programs in Pennsylvania (15-#1)” [.doc]. The draft announcement was based, in part, on the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Education policy guidance on the issue, released in December 2014: Policy Statement on Expulsion and Suspension in Early Childhood Settings.

    ELC’s comments, available below, were informed by our expertise advocating for the rights of the most vulnerable children birth through age twenty one and our extensive experience listening to the hundreds of children and families we have served each year for the past four decades. These public comments are part of ELC’s larger body of work focused on reducing exclusionary discipline that is disproportionately used on vulnerable populations and dismantling the school-to-prison pipeline that pushes at-risk youth into the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

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  • In the nine years since Congress reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), startling growth has occurred in what is often described as the “School-to-Prison Pipeline” – the use of educational policies and practices that have the effect of pushing students, especially students of color and students with disabilities, out of schools and toward the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

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